Sunday, November 26, 2017

Yuyutsu Sharma’s Current Eternal Snow Tour!





Saturday, Dec 9, at 6: 00 — 8:00 pm, Eternal Snow Readings in New York followed by Yuyutsu Sharma  & David Austell Reading their fresh work at Montauk Club, Brooklyn The Montauk Club 25 Eighth Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11217 Phone:  Phone: 646 591 9951, 917 293 9334
Friday, Dec 8, at 7: 00 pm-9:00Yuyutsu Sharma reading at Poets Aloud, BJ Spoke Gallery, 299 Main Street, Huntington, New York 11743 Host: Kelly J. Powell Seating always available, limited parking, so arrive early. Admission is free; $3 donation preferred. Refreshments available.
Tuesday, Dec 5, at 6: 30 pmErie Launch of Eternal Snow; Yuyutsu Sharma visits Poetry Night on his international tour with the anthology Eternal Snow! Book Signing. Plus poetry open mic. Upstairs for this event. Chuck Joy, poet host. Calamari’s Squid, 1317 State St. Erie, Pennsylvania 16501 Phone: 8144594276 http://www.calamaris-squidrow.com/
Sunday, Dec 3, at 7:00 pmOhio Launch Of Eternal Snow. The Anthology contributors read from the book followed by Yuyutsu Sharma reading his new work. Coffee and pastries served. Saint Pio Fine Arts Institute And Conservatory. 33 3rd St SE, Barberton, Ohio 44203 Hosted by Thomas Jenney Phone: Call (330) 328-7619
Saturday, Dec 2, at 4:30 – 7:00 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma reading at Exchange House, Akron, 760 Elms St. Akron Ohio 44310 Hosted by Noor Hindi (234) 312-9709
Thursday, Nov 30, at 7: 00 pmYuyutsu Sharma  Poet Gold & Judith Tulloch. Reading to be followed by Q&A. Organized by Calling All Poets, program host Mike JurkovicTown Crier 378 Main St. Beacon, New York, 12508 Phone: 845 855 1300
Saturday, November 18, at 2 pm until 4 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Reading with David Austell & Barbara Novack at Oceanside Library  30 Davison Ave, Oceanside, NY 11572, USA. Hosted Peter V. Dugan, 516-287-5239  http://www.oceansidelibrary.com
Tuesday, November 14, at 6:30 pm, Yuyutsu Sharma reading at The Long Island Launch of Eternal Snow,  Port Jefferson Free Library, 631 473-0022 100 Thompson Street Port Jefferson, NY, 11777, 631-473-0022 Fax: 631-473-2903 info@portjefflibrary.org Hosted by Kat Lamberg
Monday, November 13, at 7 pm until 9 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Reading as Feature Poet at Poetry Express Berkeley. Hosted by Poetry Express Berkeley, at Himalayan Flavors, 1585 University Avenue, Nearest Cross St. California, Host: Jim Barnard,  poetryexpress@gmail.com, www.poetryexpressed.com
Saturday, November 11,  Noon  to 2.30 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Reading and workshop Berkeley Public Library, Hosted by Berkeley Public Library,  2090 Kittredge St, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA  Host: Isobel Schneider, ischneider@cityofberkeley.info,  https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/
Monday, Oct 23, at 7:00 pm: Yuyutsu Sharma Reading at Boston Launch of Eternal Snow with Timothy Gager at Out of the Blue Gallery,  in the Stone Soup Poetry Series, at  541 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge. Host: Chad Parenteau  https://outoftheblueartgallery.com
Saturday, Oct 21, at 6 pm to 9 pm Brooklyn Launch of Yuyutsu Sharma’s Eternal Snow and A Workshop with the Himalayan Poet, Hosted by Yoga Sole, Windsor Terrace Brooklyn – 254 Windsor Place – Brooklyn, NY 11215 Tel: 718.541.1382 , Reading$ 10pp  Workshop $25pp Reading included) www.yogasole.com Host : Evalena Leedy evalena@yogasole.com



Thursday, November 23, 2017

Nirala Poetry Poster: Yuyutsu Sharma’s “You are a New Yorker”

 Yuyutsu Sharma’s “You are a New Yorker”
https://www.amazon.com/dp/8182500729
Art By Phil Padwe


Friday, November 10, 2017

Yuyutsu Sharma honorary mention in New York Times piece on Otis Kidwell Burger!


N.Y. / REGION



Photo

Otis Kidwell Burger in front of her townhouse, where she has lived for nearly 60 years.CreditYana Paskova for The New York Times
“Poetry Reading, 6 p.m.,” read the sign taped outside the doorway of the Bethune Street townhouse where Otis Kidwell Burger, 93, has lived for nearly 60 years.
Inside, from a rocker cushioned with red velvet, Ms. Kidwell Burger presided over the dozen or so poets gathered in her parlor, a cozy haven with Oriental rugs, a working fireplace and shelves of old books and general clutter.
Ms. Kidwell Burger, a writer and sculptor, lives with her two cats in the 1836 building that she and her then-husband, the late literary agent Knox Burger, bought in 1959. Its upper floors served as a rooming house, with rooms starting at $8 per week, she said.
“It was full of strange folks,” she said.
The room next to the magician was rented as a writing space by the author and activist Jane Jacobs, who worked on her seminal book “The Death and Life of Great American Cities” there, Ms. Kidwell Burger said.
“Jane lived around the corner on Hudson Street, but she had a house full of teenagers and it was quieter here,” said Ms. Kidwell Burger, who joined forces with Ms. Jacobs in the ’60s to resist projects threatening the small-town character of the neighborhod
“I said to her, ‘Is there any way we can stop this?’” Ms. Kidwell Burger recalled. “She leaped onto the stage and pulled the stenographer’s notes from the machine and was immediately arrested.”

Photo

Ms. Kidwell Burger has written several books, as well as poetry, science fiction and book reviews for magazines.CreditYana Paskova for The New York Times

“It hit the papers and brought attention to this stupid plan and people thought better of it,” she said.
Ms. Kidwell Burger long ago cleared out the rooming house operation upstairs but continued to rent out two upper floors. During the ’80s, the actress Jennifer Grey was a tenant, so Matthew Broderick was often around, and other young celebrities.
“I remember Madonna sitting on my stoop,” said Ms. Kidwell Burger, who lived as a child at the top of Todt Hill in Staten Island. She was a zoology major at Cornell University and settled afterward in Greenwich Village.
She and her husband hobnobbed with writers like Norman Mailer and Kurt Vonnegut, a family friend who set part of his novel, “Mother Night,” at the Bethune Street townhouse.
Ms. Kidwell Burger raised two daughters, made and sold her sculptures, and wrote several books, as well as poetry, science fiction and book reviews for numerous magazines.
Her latest book came out this year “Cats, Love & Other Surprises,” illustrated by her daughter Katherine Wilcox Burger. She has a docket of public readings lined up.
Ms. Kidwell Burger, who turns 94 on Nov. 9, writes on a Smith Corona Sterling typewriter at a foldout desk. Her assistant then reads the work and types it into a computer.
Ms. Kidwell Burger is still an outspoken activist. She does not care for President Donald J. Trump, and she has been known to walk the neighborhood holding a cardboard sign with the message, “Nasty Man, Lock Him Up.”

Photo

Yuyutsu Sharma, left, reads his poem at Ms. Kidwell Burger’s weekly gathering.CreditYana Paskova for The New York Times

She is also territorial. After flowers were recently stolen from her sidewalk planter, she taped a warning note “to the creep who keeps stealing these plants.”
Her Sunday evening invitation-only salons have a Bohemian feel. Many of the poets date back to the Village in the ’50s, and Ms. Kidwell Burger can reminisce about longshoremen working the piers and seaman living in local rooming houses and frequenting salty bars. She can recall freight trains clattering by on the tracks that are now part of the High Line.
“Now it’s one of the more expensive places in the city to live,” she said. “The billionaires are pushing out the millionaires.”
On a recent Sunday night, part of the reading was devoted to a cache of 45 sonnets that Ms. Kidwell Burger wrote some 50 years ago and then left in a drawer until dusting them off recently.
“They’re going to start comparing you to Edna St. Vincent Millay,” said Michael Graves, a poet and salon guest that night.
Mr. Graves then read a poem of his about an undocumented immigrant living in New York. Erik La Prade read his poem about the poet W.H. Auden, who lived on St. Marks Place in the East Village.
Shelley Seccombe read her poem “Interlude,” which ruminated on the challenges and rewards of negotiating New York’s alternate-side parking regulations. Yuyutsu Sharma, a Nepalese poet who treks in the Himalayas, read his poem about earning the right to be called a New Yorker.
Of course, as the old Village’s radical and political roots give way to the forces of soaring real estate, Ms. Kidwell Burger’s townhouse, which she bought for $30,000, is now appraised at $12 million, she said.
“People are constantly calling and leaving me notes asking if I want to sell,” said Ms. Kidwell Burger. She’s not interested. “The good lord isn’t making any more Village townhouses.”


East Bay Express-News for the Berkeley Reading!


Himalayan Workshop with Poet Yuyutsu R.D. Sharma 

Sat., Nov. 11, 12-2:30 p.m.
510-981-6148
ischneider@cityofberkeley.info
Free
www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/events/himalayan-workshop-poet-yuyutsu-rd-sharma
Advance signups recommended by calling 510-981-6148. Join us in the 4th floor Story Room for an exciting workshop with Himalayan poet Yuyutsu R.D. Sharma. Using mantras, prayers, folk music and striking panoramic slides of Nepal from his book, Nepal Trilogy, itinerant poet, anthologist, and translator, Yuyutsu, will discuss the oral and folk traditions of the Himalayas and read poems from his travels in three regions of the Himalayas --Everest, Annapurnas and Helambu. Advance Signups Recommended by calling 510-981-6148. First come, first served at the door if seats available.

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Books Are Magic, Brooklyn by Yuyutsu Sharma


During our restless
search for a newly
opened Bookstore
‘Books Are Magic’
on Smith Street
or some street close by,
we came across
a dead warbler,
a tiny Amazon miracle,
greyish mantle, ornate
orange head and bluish wings.
Wearing a child’s smile,
it lay still                
and when Jack touched it
with the tip of his walking stick,
it didn’t break
into a swift flight
only got pushed away.
A Prothonotary warbler,   
a tiny barrister
of swampy woodlands, 
it lay prostrate,
the lost prayer
of a beaten warrior.
‘They die every day
 in thousands,’
Jack croaked in
his shrill Brooklyn
accent, as we moved on.
“Over a billion
dead so far
hitting themselves
against glassy panes
of the Hi-rise.
They should have
a legislation to put
mock hawks on the glass panes,”
he complained,
"so they wouldn’t
dare to go near them
and drop dead.”
Like things that
once flew and shone
in our skies like magic.


@ Yuyutsu Sharma